The Aging Athlete: Inspirational Interviews With Some of the Fittest Survivors of Elite Athleticism

Can you imagine that most athletes become just as sedentary as the rest of us because they are over programmed for performance? What can we learn from a small minority of former top athletes that is especially relevant for our health and lifestyles? Even though most athletes are essentially performance minded rather than maintenance and wellness minded, it’s still a compelling revelation why 90 percent of them don’t continue a program to try and retain some of their skills and conditioning. Learning from the 10 percent who do stay fit and healthy is where we can all benefit.

The Aging Athlete chronicles the fitness and mindset of a group of fascinating retired and semi-retired athletes, of what’s worked for them over the years since they stopped competing or serving in the armed forces. Some of the top athletes include:

  • Billy Mills — 1964 10,000m race gold medalist once considered the most famous living Native American and the second Native American to win a Gold Medal.
  • Ken Shamrock — former UFC heavyweight champion who was named the World’s Most Dangerous Man.
  • Sam “Bam” Cunningham who starred in the famous 1970 Civil Rights Football Game.
  • Allen Winder, the “Blue-Eyed Soul Brother” who was called upon by Meadowlark Lemon to “break the color barrier… in reverse.”

“Sore, injured, and had enough … those are some of the reasons why athletes give up physical activity when the last whistle blows.

The BIDEN Gun Plan Expose

Sifu Slim started with some big questions and some very special aging athletes — most of whom were still keeping fit — provided some incredibly telling replies. Both athletes and non athletes will gain much by reading this book.” Gary Casaccio, M.D., Psychiatrist and longtime proponent of fitness and martial arts. Wheaton, IL

What You Will Learn In This Book

  1. Why? Why all of the attention on athletics and aging athletes? What might it be like to be the caregiver/spouse of a 28-year-old athlete who was until recently one of the most physically powerful athletes on the planet? How old is an aging athlete? Hockey great Bobby Orr was injured, and partially hobbled, at the end of his first year as a pro–age 18. His kids have never participated in competitive skating or hockey. Why did kids used to play different sports year round, all seasons, and today it’s common for young people to only take up one sport and train for it the entire year?
  2. Why isn’t wellness emphasized more for all and especially for performance oriented athletes? What are the payoffs of recreation vs. performance oriented sports?
  3. Why don’t we learn to coach ourselves? Why do high numbers of performance athletes (inc. ex military and ex ballet performers) stop maintaining fitness soon after leaving their performance time?
  4. The importance of downtime.
  5. How to pursue self-mastery.

Editorial Reviews

Review “Sore, injured, and had enough … those are some of the reasons why athletes give up physical activity when the last whistle blows. Sifu Slim started with some big questions and some very special aging athletes — most of whom were still keeping fit — provided some incredibly telling replies. Both athletes and non athletes will gain much by reading this book.”
~ Gary Casaccio, M.D., Psychiatrist and longtime proponent of fitness and martial arts. Wheaton, IL

I am grateful to Sifu Slim for his mix of determination and romanticism, that he never stops believing in people, in himself, and the pursuit of health and happiness. A great teacher, Sifu’s fairness, modesty, and sense of humor shine through and keep us smiling till our work in this physical body is done.” –Tatjana Greiner Editor and Performance Tango Dancer San Francisco, California ********** ********** “The Aging Athlete will help you unlock potential in your mind that can significantly impact your overall well-being. Its insights, logic, and practicality are outstanding. This book is meaningful, timeless, and profound.”
~ Dr. Jarrod Spencer, Sports Psychologist, Mind of the Athlete, LLC

I got both the paperback (which was a nice quality) and kindle editions! The stories of aging athletes are engaging and lively with a real perspective. I come from a family of athletes, but the book appeals to sports lovers as well. Sifu Slim interviews many interesting athletes in this book and does so in a fresh way that keeps you reading. I’m getting a couple more paperback copies to give as gifts for friends who are athletes and also for those who just have an interest in sports and fitness.
~ Amazon Reader Review From the Author Can We Learn from Former Athletes?

What can we learn from former top athletes that is especially relevant for our health and lifestyles? Even though most athletes are essentially performance minded rather than maintenance and wellness minded, it’s still a compelling revelation why 90 percent of them don’t continue a program to try and retain some of their skills and conditioning. Learning from the 10 percent who do stay fit and healthy is where we can all benefit.

“The Aging Athlete” chronicles the fitness and mindset of a group of retired and semi-retired athletes, of what’s worked for them over the years since they stopped competing or serving in the armed forces. From the Inside Flap COVER PHOTOS Randy Beisler, no. 4 pick of 1966 NFL draft. High school 6’5, 218 pounds. Age 66, same height due to his weight training regimen, 234 pounds. “Five days per week I do fitness training in the gym, about two days per week I play doubles tennis.”

INTRO by John F. Murray, PhD Clinical and Sports Psychologist Palm Beach, Florida. “I was surprised and very pleased when asked if I might introduce you to “The Aging Athlete” because it’s an excellent work that really doesn’t need an introduction. “

With the help of the motivated athletes whose stories appear in this book, Sifu Slim explains how an overly excessive amount of attention has been focused on all the physical aspects of sports and other styles of physical movement. In what could be seen as a worship of youth–by fans, stars, coaches, and even the athletes themselves–the immediate performance results gain the lion’s share of the attention.

That attention mostly seeks to keep the elite athlete healthy and successful in his or her prime, a time when grace, strength, agility, and power predominate. This youthful spark and style is what makes sports exciting and thrilling to watch and play. Think of how Romanian gymnast Nadia Comaneci is remembered today based on what she did as a 14-year-old–six perfect tens at the 1976 Montreal Olympics. For many, she is still the world’s little Nadia of her youth. Fortunately, Nadia has lived an active and exemplary life, still maintaining her fitness and spending a great deal of her time in giving back to the world.

From the Back Cover

Over 600 interviews of aging athletes hold that 90 percent of former performance athletes (inc. ex-military and physical performers like dancers) are not practicing maintenance fitness. The new sedentary lifestyle creates problems of the mind, body, and even spirit. Condensed personal biographies of the active 10 percent, especially the deeper (and sometimes darker) side of the athletes’ mindset of perseverance, show us all how to dig down, master ourselves, and be happy and well.

About the Author

Sifu Slim (Henry Kreuter) is an author, wellness educator/speaker, lifelong amateur athlete, and leading proponent of “intentional physical activity.” Sifu has developed easy-to-follow programs to empower everyone to achieve more healthful lifestyles and an instinctive wellness mindset. Inspired by legendary fitness icon Jack LaLanne, Sifu has made it his life’s mission to promote “maintenance fitness,” which makes physical activity both recreational and joyful, and a routine part of our daily lives.”The typical fitness guy has bulging biceps,” he jokes, “I have bulging ‘ perseverance and the proof is more than 13,000 days of intentional physical activity. I started back in 1967 following TV-show host Jack LaLanne and have kept wellness the driving force.”

FindADojo.com on the Martial Arts Schools Directory.
Martial Arts Schools & Businesses Directory